How the Visionary Art of Android Jones Connects Kali, Endangered Species and the Empire State Building

How the Visionary Art of Android Jones Connects Kali, Endangered Species and the Empire State Building

[su_row]
[su_column size=”1/2″]

Striking images of endangered species were projected onto the side of the iconic Empire State Building as examples of the animals we currently risk losing due to the expansion of industrial activities. In reflecting on these images, we are called to look within ourselves for ways to transform our lives to be inclusive of all life.

[su_youtube url=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYd4S-i_yms” ]

[/su_column]

[su_column size=”1/2″]

An image of Kali, as painted by Android Jones, was projected onto the Empire State Building after the scenes of endangered species. Jones said “Kali is the personification of time and death. Maha Kali is the fiercest form of Maa Durga representing the destroyer of evil and Darkness.”

[su_youtube url=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tDykLnp6j0M” ]

[/su_column]
[/su_row] 

This projection event on one of the most recognizable buildings on the planet was organized by the group who produced Racing Extinction, a film about the hidden world of the markets and industries behind the extinction of the precious species of this planet.

via Rebelle Society

In an unprecedented and awe-inspiring public display of art by filmmaker Louie Psihoyos and his team, Projecting Change, projected onto the NYC skyline by Obscura Digital, was meant to spark awareness of massive wildlife extinction, and be a chilling call to conservation turning the Empire State Building, New York’s brightest and most recognizable symbol and capitalism’s earliest totem, into the worlds greatest canvas, as well as its most epic tombstone and oracle of the Dark Feminine.

From the colossal projection of Cecil the Lion, whose recent tragic death provoked a mass outpouring of love and outrage, to the images of hundreds of nameless endangered animals, finned ones and scaled ones, horned ones and winged ones, two-legged and four, creeping and crawling and running for their lives across the Empire State Building, this revolutionary and heart-rending project, will not soon be forgotten.

“If you are not heartbroken, you are not paying attention!” this project seems to scream from its illustrious rooftop. For as the parade of near-extinct animals appear on the screen, it is impossible not to face the crushing realization that it is not a question of if hundreds of species will continue to go extinct, but when… Our shiny unsustainable systems based on glamour and greed have taken us to a world on the edge of collapse — only holy darkness can save us now.

And it was Kali, the dark mother, the destroyer of illusions and the personification of time, death and holy change, by Android Jones, that stole the show in New York, as the final, spectacular image of the installation, leaving her fierce gaze to peer into our souls.

If there was ever a sign of the times, this is it. In our bones we all recognize, we are in the death pangs of the old world, and that we make it through is anything but certain.

{source}

{source}

It is time to get our Kali on inside and out; to cut off the head and commit to the heart on all levels. So many of us are shedding our false selves, empty certainties and small lives, and no matter how much we wish for the safety of the old, the more desperately we hold on, the hotter the fires of the Real.

The quickening of the New Earth is upon us and what is needed now is the fierceness of Ma Kali. A holy oracle of change, her medicine is darkness, her initiation is by fire — she calls upon us to rise from our own ashes, to speak truth to power, take on all our shadows and take up the arms that we have, our own, to hold, serve and protect all life as we would our own child.

The Divine Feminine energy is pulsing through every pore of the planet right now, every whisper of the world soul is one intimately connected to our ecology. The ecological consciousness is feminine consciousness, systemic, interconnected, relational and embodied; nature and psyche, body and soul, the spiritual and the political can no longer remain apart.

May we burn up the convoluted narratives of separation, deprivation and control, cut off the dead promises of capitalism, step fully into our dharma, and let the Mother guide us through the fires of transfiguration. May all beings be happy. One Body. One Heart. Jai Ma!

{source}

{source}

“In preparation for the birth of the Divine, the entire human race is now going through a global dark night, which will result in a new humanity that has been humbled and chastened by tragedy, so that it may open completely to the mystery of divine grace. This dark night cannot be bargained with, explained away, leapt over or mitigated. It is the destined crucifixion of a communal human ego now clearly revealed to be suicidal, matricidal, dangerous to itself and to the whole of creation. No one and nothing will stop Kali dancing Her terrible dance of destruction and re-creation. There will be no resurrection of an embodied divine humanity without a systematic, perfectly organized, brutally complete crucifixion of everything in us that keeps us addicted to the systems of illusion that are now rapidly destroying everything.”  ~ Andrew Harvey

You can read more from Rebelle Society on this story here.

And you can see more of the innovative and esoteric work of Android Jones in the New Edition of Zig Zag Zen: Buddhism and Psychedelics

 

Artist Paul Laffoley Enters the Bardo

Artist Paul Laffoley Enters the Bardo

The world has lost a leading visionary artist in Paul Laffoley, who passed away on November 16th, 2015. His paintings featured mandala-like imagery, making heavy use of text and trans-disciplinary symbolic elements. His architectural background comes through in his depictions of complex spiritual ideas, providing a sense of looking at the blueprints of the subtle structure of reality.

mindphysics

Mind Physics: The Burning of Samsara in Zig Zag Zen: Buddhism and Psychedelics

From the Official Paul Laffoley Website:

The visionary artist and luminary, Paul Laffoley, had died after a long battle with congestive heart failure. He had an extraordinary grasp of multiple fields of knowledge compulsively pursing interests that often lead him into uncharted territory. His complex theoretical constructs were uniquely presented in highly detailed mandala-like canvases largely scaled to Fibonacci’s golden ratio. While an active participant in numerous speculative organizations including his own Boston Visionary Cell since the early 70s, his work began to attract an increasing following in his late career with shows at the Palais de Tokyo (2009), the Nationalgalerie/Hamburger Bahnhof Berlin (2011), and the Hayward Gallery, London, the Henry Art Gallery, Seattle, and the Yerba Buena Center in 2013. The first book on Laffoley’s oeuvre was published by Kent Fine Art in 1989, followed by several subsequent publications beginning with his first retrospective organized by the Austin Museum of Art (1999). Forthcoming in March of 2016, the University of Chicago Press will be releasing the long awaited book entitled The Essential Paul Laffoley. He was a kind and generous giant, and he will be sorely missed by all of us.

Paul Laffoley was one of the visionary artists featured in Zig Zag Zen: Buddhism and Psychedelics.

Remembering Ornette Coleman

Remembering Ornette Coleman

Our dear friend Ornette Coleman passed away on June 11. Our condolences go out to his son, Denardo, and extended family in this time of loss. We will always remember the delight and inspiration that he and his music brought us over the years.

The video below is a clip from the award-winning documentary Ornette… Made in America, featuring the opening celebration for the Caravan of Dreams Performing Arts Center  in the city of Coleman’s birth, Fort Worth, Texas. The city of Fort Worth welcomed back their native son with a mayoral proclamation of September 29, 1983 as “Ornette Coleman Day,” and Coleman was presented with a key to the city. On that night, Caravan of Dreams opened with Ornette and Prime Time on stage, while dancers twirled around the cameras in this film directed by Shirley Clarke. (Courtesy of Global Ecotechnics)

[su_youtube url=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZP_KNCm2yQ” width=”360″ height=”280″]

 

And we leave you with a poem by his friend, Johnny Dolphin.

Ornette Coleman’s Manhattan

Ship searching out cross-currents,
Myself stalking this big city
Ornette and me circling higher in simple talk
Until words turn prayer flags
Whipped into tatters on passes between peaks
While music shatters into microtones
Leading captured melodies into ancient slavery.
My poems are your saxophone
Your sax reads my reading;
Words and music make mad lucinations
Navigating existence into pulse.
You threw away keys,
I threw away logics,
We honed our intuition
Rapping in an old warehouse pad.
Our Apollonian attractors dive,
Nitroxed in gaudy Dionysian reefs.
Trip of trips
Stately fandango
Cold sober in every drunken gene,
While sweet potato pie
Concentrates our eye.

 

From: Off the Road: Poetry 1989-2000

 

New release, digitally restored classic documentary on Ornette Coleman, “Made in America,” premiered in New York

Synergetic Press, previous distributor of the Ornette Coleman classic film is pleased to announce the new release through Milestone Films of “Ornette: Made in America.” 

Ornette: Made In America captures Ornette’s evolution over three decades. Returning home to Fort Worth, Texas in 1983 as a famed performer and composer, documentary footage, dramatic scenes, and some of the first music video-style segments ever made, chronicle his boyhood in segregated Texas and his subsequent emergence as an American cultural pioneer and world-class icon. Among those who contribute to the film include William Burroughs, Brion Gysin, Buckminster Fuller, Don Cherry, Yoko Ono, Charlie Haden, Robert Palmer, Jayne Cortez and John Rockwell.

The film was recently featured in the New York Times:

“Ornette: Made in America,” which was released theatrically in 1985 and opens again, in a print restored by Milestone Films, at the IFC Center in Manhattan on Friday, is full of such tantalizing stuff: formal juxtapositions, half-sketched implications, parallel experiments of image and sound. By virtue of the footage alone, it’s a valuable time capsule for anyone drawn to Mr. Coleman’s work, particularly in the two decades following the cusp of the 1960s, when his dauntless, affirming vision of free improvisation famously created a crisis of faith in jazz.

-By  from the New York Times

 

Read the full NYT ReviewWatch a clip from the film

Pin It on Pinterest