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Psychedelic Society UK Presents A Talk with Lama Mike Crowley

Psychedelic Society UK Presents A Talk with Lama Mike Crowley

The Psychedelic Society UK Presents An Evening with Lama Mike Crowley, Author of Secret Drugs of Buddhism 

The Psychedelic Society UK will be hosting a talk together with Synergetic Press author of Secret Drugs of Buddhism, ordained lama Mike Crowley, on 29th September from 1-3 PM CDT or 7-9 PM UK time.

After over 50 years of study, Mike has amassed incontrovertible evidence that psychedelic plants and fungi were part of medieval Buddhism. This is especially so in the tantric school of Buddhism known as Vajrayana in which a psychedelic sacrament called the “elixir of immortality” (Sanskrit: amṛita) played a central role. This school was based upon scriptures called tantras which concealed their secrets behind multiple levels of meaning. Mike will reveal the simple puns and Sanskrit wordplay which indicate the nature of this “elixir”.

More about Mike Crowley

Mike Crowley is originally from Wales but currently lives in a remote cabin in a vast forest in northern California. His book, Secret Drugs of Buddhism: Psychedelic Sacraments and the Origins of the Vajrayana was published recently and he sits on the advisory board of the Psychedelic Sangha of the US. He has been known to teach Buddhism. He is familiar with Sanskrit, Tibetan, and Mandarin Chinese. Mike has lectured at the Museum of Asia and the Pacific, Warsaw, the Jagellonian University, Cracow, The California Institute of Integral Studies, San Francisco, and at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His work has been published in Fortean Times, Time and Mind: The Journal of Archaeology, Consciousness, and Culture, Psychedelic American, and Psychedelic Press UK.

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Secret Drugs of Buddhism Book Launch in San Francisco

Secret Drugs of Buddhism Book Launch in San Francisco

Secret Drugs of Buddhism Prayer OfferingSecret Drugs of Buddhism Book Launch

We want to issue a massive thank you to everyone who joined us for our Secret Drugs of Buddhism Book Launch at Haight Street Art Center on 18th November in San Francisco as well as those who attended  Psychedelic Sangha’s DARSHAN 9 event that took place at Lang College of the New School in New York. Both events were aimed at exploring and celebrating the convergence of psychedelic studies and Buddhism whilst simultaneously celebrating the launch of Michael Crowley’s new book.

The Book Launch was kicked off with a mantra meditation led by Michael Crowley in which he relayed a yogic technique from the Dzogchen tradition which helps to engage the parasympathetic nervous system. Experience Michael’s guided meditation here.

Psychedelics in Buddhism: Evidence of Amrita in Tibetan Art

 

The scriptures of the Vajrayāna repeatedly make reference to a sacrament called amrita, the  Sanskrit term for ‘immortality’. The word amrita is significantly older than the Vajrayāna and was also used within the ancient Indian scripture, the Rig Veda, (composed c. 2000 BC) as a synonym for soma, the divine intoxicant. At the Secret Drugs of Buddhism Book Launch, Mike Crowley gave a presentation highlighting the ubiquitous prevalence of amrita in Tibetan art as well as recounting personal anecdotes about his path as an upasaka of the Kagyud lineage.

Panel Discussion on Buddhism and Psychedelics led by Erik Davis (Psychedelic Sangha)

One of the highlights of the evening was a panel discussion moderated by author, podcaster, and award-winning journalist, Erik Davis. Erik Davis also is co-founder of the Psychedelic Sangha in NYC and actively organises the San Francisco Sangha. 

Many psychedelics are reentering culture under the necessity of the medicalisation framework due to the hierarchy of approvals that are needed to legitimise them as healing tools. Psychoactive substances and the Buddhist tradition converge on the aphex of spiritual experience. This discussion served to “probe the heretical edge” of this controversial, but crucial topic, exploring the relationship between psychedelic sacraments and Buddhist practice; the importance of the role of community (Sangha) in integrating mystical experiences; the ways in which Buddhist doctrine and practice is inherently ‘psychedelic’ and much more.

Erik Davis, Mariavittoria Mangini, David Presti, and Allan Badiner at Secret Drugs of Buddhism discussion panel

Discussion panel with Erik Davis, Mariavittoria Mangini, David Presti, and Allan Badiner

Panellists included: 

Erik Davis, author of TechGnosis: Myth, Magic, and Mysticism in the Age of Information, a cult classic of visionary media studies. He has contributed chapters on art, music, technoculture, and contemporary spirituality to over a dozen books, including Zig Zag Zen: Buddhism and Psychedelics. His latest book, High Weirdness, explores the new counterculture of drugs, esoterica and visionary experience that emerged in the 1970s. 

Mariavittoria Mangini Ph.D., FNP is a member of faculty at the California Institute of Integral Studies Psychedelic-Assisted Psychotherapy Program. Her academic interest has been the historiography of psychedelics and she has written extensively on the impact of psychedelic experiences in shaping the lives of her contemporaries. 

David Presti Ph.D. is a neurobiologist, psychologist, and cognitive scientist at the University of California, Berkeley, where he has taught since 1991. Since 2004, He has been teaching neuroscience to Tibetan monks and nuns in India, Bhutan, and Nepal, part of a contemporary dialogue between science and spirituality initiated by the Dalai Lama.

Allan Badiner is a contributing editor at Tricycle magazine, and the editor of Zig Zag Zen: Buddhism and Psychedelics. He also edited the books, Dharma Gaia: A Harvest in Buddhism and Ecology, and Mindfulness in the Marketplace. Allan holds an MA from the College of Buddhist Studies in LA and serves on the boards of Rainforest Action Network, Threshold Foundation, and Project CBD.

Deborah Parrish Snyder at the Secret Drugs of Buddhism book launch marvelling @phaneros_art's visionary gallery.

Publisher, Deborah Parrish Snyder at the Secret Drugs of Buddhism book launch marvelling Sander Bos’ “The Veil”

Partners & Exhibitors

We’d also like to give a special thanks to the San Francisco Psychedelic Society for partnering and exhibiting with us, and the SF Dharma Collective for exhibiting and helping to make this evening such a uplifting event. 

The renowned curator Phaneros Art awed us with an elevating exhibit of visionary art, including paintings by artists like Sander Bos and Bernard Dumaine. Phaneros Art is a platform devoted to curating peak experiences through showcasing visionary art, with the word Phaneros coming from the Greek phan “to show” and eros “love.

Musical Offerings

No Book Launch would be complete without a little celebratory party. The musical offerings of the evening included Sound Temple, a soul soothing duo comprised of Stephen Kent, the pioneering Australian Aborinal didjeridu player, and ritualistic teacher and performer, Jeffrey Alpjonsus Mooney. Following this, LA-based Lynda Arnold, otherwise known as Divasonic, graced us with her healing melodies. The night was concluded by DJ Goz, SF-based Michael Gosney who has been producing transformational events since the 1980s such as a Digital Be-In series, and Burning Man Community Dance series.

Cover Art of 2nd Edition of Secret Drugs of Buddhism by Michael Crowley About Secret Drugs of Buddhism 

Did the Buddhists of the ancient world make use of shamanic plants and psychedelic sacraments in their sacred rituals and practices?

This is the provocative question that Buddhist lama and author, Michael Crowley, explores in his recently re-published book, Secret Drugs of Buddhism: Psychedelic Sacraments and the Origins of the Vajrayāna.

Drawing on scriptural sources, botany, pharmacology, and religious iconography, Crowley calls attention to the central role which psychedelics have played in Indian religions and traces their history from the mysterious soma, venerated in the ancient Hindu scriptures, to amrita, the sacramental drink of the Vajrayāna.

Get your copy of Secret Drugs of Buddhism


More About San Francisco Psychedelic Society 

San Francisco Psychedelic Society Logo

The San Francisco Psychedelic Society is a Bay Area organization devoted to weaving community with people from all walks of life who share an interest in the exploration of altered states of consciousness. They frequently organize events with the purpose of educating people on psychoactive substances, providing support, and opportunities for integration and spirtual growth. The current leaders of the San Francisco Psychedelic Society include Deth Warner, Danielle Negrin, and Damla Gunngor.

Keep up-to-date with the San Francisco Psychedelic Society psychedelicsocietysf.org or @psychedelicsocietysf

More About Psychedelic Sangha

Psychedelic Sangha Logo Sangha संघ (saṃgha) is Sanskrit for “spiritual community.” Psychedelic Sangha offers a safe and supportive spiritual community with a commitment to discernment, practice, and play. They provide refuge to those who value the integration of Indic-based yoga and meditation with psychedelic exploration. Psychedelic Sangha is headquartered in NYC, with groups in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Boulder, and Montréal.

Their public mission is to organize and host spiritual trips—immersive experiences that facilitate the encounter of psychedelics and meditation in a spirit of critical dialogue, ethics, community-building, and navigational group practice. 

Keep up-to-date with Psychedelic Sangha @Psychedelic_sangha or psychedelicsangha.org


About the Author Michael Crowley

Author of Secret Drugs of Buddhism Mike CrowleyMichael Crowley was born February 26th, 1948 in Cardiff, Wales. He began studying Buddhism with a Tibetan lama in 1966, becoming an upasaka of the Kagyud lineage in 1970. In order to augment his Buddhist studies, he acquainted himself with Sanskrit, Tibetan, and Mandarin Chinese. Mike has lectured at the Museum of Asia and the Pacific, Warsaw, the Jagiellonian University, Cracow, the California Institute of Integral Studies, San Francisco, and at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His work has been published in Fortean Times, Time and Mind: The Journal of Archaeology, Consciousness, and Culture, Psychedelic American, and Psychedelic Press UK. In January 2016, Mike received the R. Gordon Wasson Award for outstanding contributions to the field of entheobotany. He currently serves on the advisory board of the Psychedelic Sangha, a group of psychedelically-inclined Buddhists, based in New York and he teaches at the Dharma Collective in San Francisco.


Other Books on Psychedelics by Synergetic Press

Zig Zag Zen: Buddhism and Psychedelics edited by Allan BadinerZig Zag Zen: Buddhism and Psychedelics edited by Allan Badiner 

More than ever, people are in pursuit of greater fulfillment in their lives, seeking a deeper spiritual truth and strategies for liberation from suffering. Both Buddhism and psychedelics are inevitable subjects encountered on the journey to wisdom. Examined together, the reader may understand more deeply the essence of each. Edited by Tricycle contributing editor Allan Badiner and with art edited by renowned visionary artist Alex GreyZig Zag Zen features a foreword by Buddhist scholar Stephen Batchelor, a preface by religion historian Huston Smith, and numerous essays, interviews, and art, that lie outside the scope of mainstream anthologies.

Ethnopharmacologic Search for Psychoactive Drugs edited by Dennis McKenna and Wade Davis published by Synergetic PressEthnopharmacologic Search for Psychoactive Drugs: 50 Years of Research (1967-2017) edited by Dennis McKenna

Certain plants have long been known to contain healing properties and used to treat everything from depression and addiction, to aiding in on one’s own spiritual well-being for hundreds of years. Can Western medicine find new cures for human ailments by tapping into indigenous plant wisdom? And why the particular interest in the plants with psychoactive properties? These two conference volume proceedings provide an abundance of answers. The first international gathering of researchers held in San Francisco, California on this subject was in 1967, sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and U.S. Public Health Service. It was an interdisciplinary group of specialists gathered in one place to share their findings on a topic that was gaining widespread interest: The use of psychoactive plants in indigenous societies. The WAR ON DRUGS which intervened slowed advances in this field.

Research, however, has continued, and in the fifty years since that first conference, new and significant discoveries have been made. A new generation of researchers, many inspired by the giants present at that first conference, has continued to investigate the outer limits of ethnopsychopharmacology. In June of 2017, once again specialists from around the world in fields of ethnopharmacology, chemistry, botany, and anthropology gathered to discuss their research and findings in a setting that encouraged the free and frank exchange of information and ideas onthe last 50 years of research, and assess the current and possible futures for research in ethnopsychopharmacology. The papers given at the 2017 Symposium, organized by Dr. Dennis McKenna, appear in this handsome two-volume boxed collectors set represents perhaps themost significant body of knowledge in this interdisciplinary field available.

Browse related books on consciousness and psychedelics

 

Synergetic Symposium and Salon: Secret Drugs of Buddhism Book Launch

Synergetic Symposium and Salon: Secret Drugs of Buddhism Book Launch

Secret Drugs of Buddhism Book Launch

We are delighted to announce a one-of-a-kind event exploring and celebrating the convergence of psychedelic studies and Buddhism with the launch of The Secret Drugs of Buddhism by Mike Crowley. Hosted by our publisher, Deborah Parrish Snyder, and associate publisher, Michael Gosney at the beautiful Haight Street Art Center in San Francisco on 18th October 2019. 

The evening’s experiences include:

The evening’s experiences include:

• Mantra Meditation led by Mike Crowley

• Panel Discussion: Buddhism and Psychedelics
Erik Davis – (Psychedelic Sangha, moderator)
Allan Badiner – author, Zig Zag Zen: Buddhism and Psychedelics
David Presti – Prof. of Neurobiology, UC Berkeley
Mariavittoria Mangini, PhD, FNP – CIIS Psychedlic-Assisted Therapy program

• Mike Crowley presentation and book signing

• Musical Offerings
Sound Temple with Stephen Kent and Jeffrey Alphonsos Mooney

Deep Jam with Mike Crowley and emergent players

Divasonic – live electronic set

DJ Goz – closing grooves

• Exhibitors:
Psychedelic Society of San Francisco
SF Dharma Collective
MAPS

• Visionary Art by Phaneros Gallery

• Cash bar (by donation) – wine and beer

When & Where? 

The Synergetic Salon and Symposium: Secret Drugs of Buddhism Book Launch will take place on Friday, 18th October at San Francisco’s Haight Street Art Center, with doors opening at 7:00 pm. 

Buy Tickets Here  

Buddhism & Psychedelics Panelists Include: 

Erik DavisErik Davis Ph.D. is an author, podcaster, award-winning journalist, and popular speaker based in San Francisco. He is the author of TechGnosis: Myth, Magic, and Mysticism in the Age of Information, a cult classic of visionary media studies. He has contributed chapters on art, music, technoculture, and contemporary spirituality to over a dozen books, including Zig Zag Zen: Buddhism and Psychedelics. His latest book, High Weirdness, explores the new counterculture of drugs, esoterica and visionary experience that emerged in the 1970s. He is also co-founder of Psychedelic Sangha, organizing the San Francisco Sangha. 

Allan BadinerAllan Badiner is a contributing editor at Tricycle magazine, and the editor of Zig Zag Zen: Buddhism and Psychedelics. He also edited the books, Dharma Gaia: A Harvest in Buddhism and Ecology, and Mindfulness in the Marketplace, and his written work appears in other books including Dharma Family Treasures, Meeting the Buddha, Ecological Responsibility: A Dialogue with Buddhism, and The Buddha and the Terrorist. Allan holds an MA from the College of Buddhist Studies in LA and serves on the boards of Rainforest Action Network, Threshold Foundation, and Project CBD. He has been a student of Vietnamese monk, Thich Nhat Hanh, for more than 25 years.

David Presti Ph.D. is a neurobiologist, psychologist, and cognitive scientist at the University of California, Berkeley, where he has taught since 1991. Between 1990 and 2000, he worked as a clinical psychologist in the treatment of addiction and of post-traumatic-stress disorder (PTSD) at the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in San Francisco. Since 2004, He has been teaching neuroscience to Tibetan monks and nuns in India, Bhutan, and Nepal, part of a contemporary dialogue between science and spirituality initiated by the Dalai Lama. His areas of expertise include human neurobiology and neurochemistry, the effects of drugs on the brain and the mind, the clinical treatment of addiction, and the scientific study of mind and consciousness.

Maria ManginiMariavittoria Mangini Ph.D., FNP is a member of faculty at California Institute of Integral Studies Psychedelic-Assisted Psychotherapy Program. Her academic interest has been the historiography of psychedelics and she has written extensively on the impact of psychedelic experiences in shaping the lives of her contemporaries. She has worked closely with many of the most distinguished investigators in this field. Her current project is the development of a Thanatology Program for the study of death and dying.

Secret Drugs of Buddhism Pre-Order Discount

Did the Buddhists of the ancient world make use of shamanic plants and psychedelic sacraments in their sacred rituals? This is the broad topic that Buddhist lama and author, Michael Crowley, attempts to unfurl in his book Secret Drugs of Buddhism: Psychedelic Sacraments and the Origins of the Vajrayāna. Crowley’s book is the culmination of over forty years of research exploring the extensive historical evidence for the use of entheogenic plants within the Buddhist tradition. Learn more about the Secret Drugs of Buddhism.

To further celebrate the release of this exciting book, we are currently offering a 40% discount on all pre-order purchases of Secret Drugs of Buddhism.

Pre-order Secret Drugs of Buddhism

Evan Hirsch Interview with Mike Crowley at Psychedelic Science 2017

“There is no fluff, it is just solid information. The reason that someone might want to read it [Secret Drugs of Buddhism] is that it legitimises the use of psychedelics in a sane and responsible manner for spiritual progress. It shows that for hundreds of years that were used perfectly well, perfectly safely in this manner when used with great respect and used in a spiritual context.” —Mike Crowley

More About the Author, Michael Crowley 

Mike Crowley - The authorMichael Crowley was born on February 26th, 1948 in Cardiff, Wales. He began studying Buddhism with a Tibetan lama in 1966, becoming an upasaka of the Kagyud lineage in 1970. In order to augment his Buddhist studies, he acquainted himself with Sanskrit, Tibetan, and Mandarin Chinese. Mike has lectured at the Museum of Asia and the Pacific, Warsaw, the Jagiellonian University, Cracow, the California Institute of Integral Studies, San Francisco, and at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His work has been published in Fortean Times, Time and Mind: The Journal of Archaeology, Consciousness, and Culture, Psychedelic American, and Psychedelic Press UK. In January 2016, Mike received the R. Gordon Wasson Award for outstanding contributions to the field of entheobotany. He currently serves on the advisory board of the Psychedelic Sangha, a group of psychedelically-inclined Buddhists, based in New York and he teaches at the Dharma Collective in San Francisco.

Secret Drugs of Buddhism by Mike Crowley

Secret Drugs of Buddhism by Mike Crowley

Delving into the Secret Drugs of Buddhism

Did the Buddhists of the ancient world make use of shamanic plants and psychedelic sacraments in their sacred rituals? This is the broad topic that Buddhist lama and author, Michael Crowley, attempts to unfurl in his book Secret Drugs of Buddhism: Psychedelic Sacraments and the Origins of the Vajrayāna. Crowley’s book is the culmination of over forty years of research exploring the extensive historical evidence for the use of entheogenic plants within the Buddhist tradition.

It is often supposed that Buddhism is and has always been ‘drug-free’, and is rather something that is practiced entirely by one’s own efforts. This view of Buddhism can be thought to stem from the fact that Buddhism has largely taken root in global consciousness through the work of the exiled Tibetan leader and Buddhist teacher, H. H. The Dalai Lama. Nowadays, there is a common misconception that the Buddhism practiced in Tibet is representative of all Buddhism and that it is the default, normative version of Buddhist practice.  

However, the book focuses on an earlier form of Buddhism, known as Vajrayāna Buddhism. The Vajrayāna movement of Buddhism began in the 5th and 6th centuries AD. The scriptures of the Vajrayāna continually make reference to a sacrament called amrita, the term for ‘immortality’ in Sanskrit. The term amrita is significantly older than the Vajrayāna and was used within the ancient Indian scripture, the Rig Veda, (composed c. 2000 BC) as a synonym for soma, the divine intoxicant.

A Closer Look at the Vajrayāna

Drawing on scriptural sources, botany, pharmacology, and religious iconography, the book calls attention to the central role which psychedelics have played in Indian religions. It traces their history from the mysterious soma, venerated in the ancient Hindu scriptures, to amrita, the sacramental drink of the  Vajrayāna. Although the amrita used in modern Vajrayāna ceremonies lacks any psychoactivity, there is copious evidence that the amrita used by the earliest Vajrayāna practitioners was a potent entheogen.

A glance at the titles of Vajrayāna scriptures will find the word amrita again and again. Many Vajrayāna deities have amrita as part of their name and a liquid called amrita is frequently visualized in Vajrayāna meditations. Almost all the early teachers of the Vajrayāna are depicted holding skull-cups of amrita. Two “skull-cups” of amrita adorn Vajrayāna altars and a drink called amrita is consumed at all major Vajrayāna rituals. Hundreds of Vajrayāna deities are said to carry amrita in some form, whether in a skull-cup, vase, flask or bowl.

Consider, for example, the prominent meditation-deity Hevajra. He is usually described and depicted as having sixteen arms with every hand holding a skull-cup filled with amrita and in one of his several variants he and his tantric consort arise out of the amrita itself.

And yet, despite multiple references in Vajrayāna literature and near-ubiquitous depictions in Vajrayāna art, you may be forgiven for never having heard of amrita before. If you are, as I am myself, a practicing Vajrayānist, then you may have performed the Vajrasattva purification practice in which the body is (mentally) filled with amrita. But the actual nature of amrita, its origin and history, are rarely discussed, if at all. In fact, even a standard textbook which provides a detailed account of Vajrayāna Buddhism as practiced in India and Tibet has managed to overlook it entirely.

2nd Edition of Secret Drugs Coming Out Fall 2019

We are excited to announce that this upcoming Fall 2019 we are scheduled to publish the 2nd edition of Secret Drugs of Buddhism. Don’t miss out on our pre-order discount, and order your copy with us now!

Pre-order Secret Drugs of Buddhism

Interview on Adventures Through the Mind Podcast 

Learn more about Secret Drugs of Buddhism through this fascinating podcast interview with James W. Jesso, 2016. In this episode, Michael unpacks symbolism within the Vajrayāna tradition, examining the vast history of Buddhism, and retells the story of how the book came to be!


Upcoming Author Events

June 21st, 7:30-9:00 PM, An introductory explanation of Hinayana, Mahayana, and Vajrayāna @ SF Dharma Collective

3 classes: Friday, June 21, July 5th, and August 2nd. The talks provide a basic outline for understanding the different philosophies, meditations, and practices of the three vehicles, as well as their historical context. Each of the three sessions will include a meditation session appropriate to the vehicle under discussion.

Want to know more? Check out the SF Dharma Collective’s Calendar.


More About Michael Crowley 

Michael Crowley was born February 26th, 1948 in Cardiff, Wales. He began studying Buddhism with a Tibetan lama in 1966, becoming an upasaka of the Kagyud lineage in 1970. In order to augment his Buddhist studies, he acquainted himself with Sanskrit, Tibetan, and Mandarin Chinese. Mike has lectured at the Museum of Asia and the Pacific, Warsaw, the Jagiellonian University, Cracow, the California Institute of Integral Studies, San Francisco, and at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His work has been published in Fortean Times, Time and Mind: The Journal of Archaeology, Consciousness, and Culture, Psychedelic American, and Psychedelic Press UK. In January 2016, Mike received the R. Gordon Wasson Award for outstanding contributions to the field of entheobotany. He currently serves on the advisory board of the Psychedelic Sangha, a group of psychedelically-inclined Buddhists, based in New York and he teaches at the Dharma Collective in San Francisco.


Praise for Secret Drugs of Buddhism 

Mike Crowley has manifested a delightful book on a topic rarely spoken of, and certainly never explored with such depth. With a combination of personal anecdotes, detailed historical research, and a large collection of traditional art, this book will encourage modern-day Buddhist yogis and mind-explorers to see their practice and its roots in a new way.  —Rev. Kokyo Henkel, Head Teacher, Santa Cruz Zen Center

Writing clearly, in the fashion of an investigative reporter, Mike Crowley unlocks the mystery of amrita, and answers, with previously unseen certainty, the question of whether or not psychedelics were part of historical Buddhist practice. Allan Badiner, Co-editor of Zig Zag Zen: Buddhism and Psychedelics

Psychedelic drugs in ancient Buddhism? Believe it. Don’t believe it? Read this book. —Clark Heinrich, Author of Magic Mushrooms in Religion and Alchemy

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